Cumberland Troutfitters

fishing and river reports

june 16, 2019

generation schedules continue to be less than ideal. most weekdays have a relatively short window of time before water reaches terminal levels. weekends have shown slight relief. motor boat traffic was heavy on the upper river today, and most of the banks from rockhouse down were blown out muddy from the wakes by late morning. fishing has been somewhat sporadic through stretches. a variety of beadhead nymphs and sowbugs have been moving some fish, and at times some nice slot size rainbows and browns. if you are into such things, a variety of egg patterns and wormy-like things are catching some fish as well. streamers, particularly white patterns, have been moving some fish in places. this is definitely a better tactic with cloud cover. sunshine usually a killer for the cumberland streamer fishing.

38,000 cutthroat trout were stocked into the river in april, marking the first stocking of true cutthroats in the cumberland. cutthroats are notorious dry fly eaters so hopefully some fine times ahead! we certainly look forward to meeting some of these cutts soon! most of these fish were stocked lower down on the river, near burkesville, because of ramp access at the time of stocking. however, we have seen a few of these fish in the upper stretches of river, particularly in and around rainbow run and charcoal flat, so they have been migrating to upper reaches of the river.

here are a few helpful generalities to keep in mind. location and drift more important than fly selection! in bigger water don’t get caught fishing too far into the main channel. most fish will be concentrated near structure and along seams near the bank, particularly areas with rocky depth changes. any number of different beadhead nymphs will do just fine. most of the standard generic trout patterns will work at one time or another. seems that some days some flash in the nymph seems to help. just have to try a few and see what is best! most importantly, can’t catch them from the couch! so get out there and give it a try! hope to see you on the water soon

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NEWS ETC.

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CAME ACROSS THIS INTERESTING TABLE FROM A RECENT ELECTROFISHING SURVEY CONDUCTED BY KDFWR. WHAT THEY CALL LONG BAR IS ACTUALLY WHAT GUIDES REFER TO AS SNOW ISLAND, SO THIS IS A SERIES OF 5 PASSES, EACH 15 MINUTES IN DURATION, FROM SNOW ISLAND TO ROCKHOUSE. OF COURSE, ELECTROFISHING IS FAR FROM AN EXACT SCIENCE, BUT THESE NUMBERS INDICATED THAT LARGE BROWN TROUT WERE NOT PLENTIFUL (OR NON-EXISTANT!) IN THIS SECTION OF THE RIVER, AND BROOK TROUT NOT DOING WELL. I WOULD HAVE AGREED WITH THIS ASSESSMENT ON AUGUST 22, BUT THESE LAST COUPLE OF WEEKS I HAVE SEEN SOME REALLY NICE BROWNS TAKEN in and around THIS STRETCH, SO AM NOW OF THE BELIEF THAT THE LARGE BROWNS ARE AS ELUSIVE TO THE ELECTROFISHING ROD AS THEY ARE THE FLY ROD. OR COULD BE THEY JUST MOVED IN TO THIS AREA RECENTLY? ANYWAY, WORD ON THE STREET IS THAT KDFWR IS PLANNING ON RELEASING SOME LARGER BROWNS (~15”) INTO THE RIVER THIS FALL, WITH THE HOPES THEY WILL HOLD OVER THROUGH THE WINTER, GET FAT AND HAPPY, AND ENTER THE SPRING SEASON FULL OF PISS AND VINEGAR. SOUNDS LIKE A GOOD PLAN TO ME! I’VE CERTAINLY BOATED A GOOD NUMBER OF SLOT RAINBOWS THRU THIS STRETCH OVER THE SUMMER, SO NOT SURE WHY MORE OF THOSE BIG BOWS AREN’T SHOWING UP IN THE SURVEY, BUT MAYBE THEY ARE A BIT TOO WILY FOR THE SHOCKING BOAT TOO? I WOULD AGREE WITH THE DIRE BROOK TROUT SITUATION. THEY JUST DON’T SEEM TO SURVIVE WELL IN THE CUMBERLAND. HAVEN’T netted BUT A COUPLE DOZEN ALL SUMMER, WHEREAS SEVERAL YEARS AGO, NOT LONG AFTER THEY STARTED THE BROOK TROUT STOCKING PROGRAM, IT WASN’T UNCOMMON TO CATCH 15 OR 20 BROOKIES IN A DAY. I’M SURE IT IS A NUMBER OF PREDATION FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO THIS, CHIEF AMONG THEM STRIPERS FROM BELOW AND HERONS FROM ABOVE. NOT SURE IF THERE IS A LONG TERM SOLUTION TO MAKING BROOK TROUT POPULATIONS VIABLE IN THE RIVER BUT I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IT HAPPEN. HAVE ALWAYS DREAMED OF CATCHING A 5#+ BROOKIE!! WOULD MUCH RATHER DO THAT THAN CATCH A 30# STRIPER WITH two dozen little brook trout in his belly!